Disease & Pest Control Program

Disease and Predatory Pest Control services are provided by Agricultural Services for certain pests listed under the Agricultural Pests Act. The services are provided as an aid and should be coupled with good prevention management to reduce the potential for problems both now and in the future. Learn more about the Alberta Insect Pest Monitoring Network.

When risks associated with wildlife in urban settings exist, Alberta Fish and Wildlife will be consulted to help producers and property owners deal with wildlife-caused damage.


Learn more about beneficial insects for your crops


Questions?
Call 403-223-8735
Monday - Friday 8:00 am - 4:30 pm


Visit Alberta's Bacterial Ring Rot site by clicking here: https://www.alberta.ca/bacterial-ring-rot-pest.aspx

Clubroot is a serious soil-borne disease of canola, mustard and other crops in the cabbage family. Cole crop vegetables like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, Chinese cabbage, kale, kohlrabi, radish, rutabaga and turnip, are susceptible to clubroot, as are many cruciferous weeds, for example, wild mustard, stinkweed and shepherd's purse.

For more information on crop diseases visit the Government of Alberta website.

The MD of Taber assists residents with predator concerns. It is virtually impossible to eliminate all predators and the damage they cause to livestock, but good management can reduce this damage and still be consistent with all types of livestock production. Since every farm is different, there is no single practice or combination of practices that will be right for every situation. Therefore, when predators strike, it is important to be aware of all options available for their control and to act at once.

Visit Alberta's Dutch Elm Disease site by clicking here: https://www.alberta.ca/dutch-elm-disease.aspx

Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a serious fungal disease of cereal crops that affects kernel development. The main cause of FHB is the fungus Fusarium Graminearum, which results in significant losses in grain yield and grain quality, and triggers the production of mycotoxins.

Visit Alberta's Grasshopper management site by clicking here: https://www.alberta.ca/grasshopper-management.aspx

Late blight is one of the most serious diseases of potatoes and tomatoes worldwide, resulting in significant yield and quality losses annually. In general, Late blight occurs in Alberta infrequently but can have devastating impacts in the years when it reaches epidemic levels.

The Agricultural Services department is your local call for rat sightings. If you think you have seen a rat, or signs of a rat infestation, please call 403-223-8735 immediately so an investigation can begin.

Visit Alberta's Rat Control program by clicking here: https://www.alberta.ca/albertas-rat-control-program.aspx

Phostoxin (Aluminum Phosphide) is used for the control of stored grain pests and Richardson Ground Squirrels (gophers). 

To purchase Phostoxin, landowners must have obtained a Farmer Pesticide Course Certificate and the completion of either the Grain Bin Fumigation or Rodent Control module. The Farmer Pesticide Certificate is a self-taught program and the exam is administered through the Agricultural Services. Once the exam has been completed and a passing grade is accomplished, a certificate number will be issued by Alberta Government. The Farmer Pesticide Certificate is valid for 5 years from the time of issue. 

Fire Ban in Effect
Fire Ban in Effect